can't hack it

Can't hack it
Unable to perform an act, duty, job etc. (example: I have to quit my job as a computer technician; I just can't hack it.)

The small dictionary of idiomes. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hack — [[t]hæ̱k[/t]] hacks, hacking, hacked 1) VERB If you hack something or hack at it, you cut it with strong, rough strokes using a sharp tool such as an axe or knife. [V n] An armed gang barged onto the train and began hacking and shooting anyone in …   English dictionary

  • hack — hack1 [hæk] v [: Old English; Origin: haccian] 1.) [I and T] to cut something roughly or violently hack (away) at sth ▪ She hacked away at the ice, trying to make a hole. hack sth off/down etc ▪ Whole forests have been hacked down. hack your way… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • hack — 1 verb 1 (intransitive always + adv/prep, transitive always + adv prep) to cut something into pieces roughly or violently: hack away/at etc: She hacked away at the ice, trying to make a hole. | hack sth into/through etc: We had to hack a path… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • hack — hack1 /hak/, v.t. 1. to cut, notch, slice, chop, or sever (something) with or as with heavy, irregular blows (often fol. by up or down): to hack meat; to hack down trees. 2. to break up the surface of (the ground). 3. to clear (a road, path,… …   Universalium

  • Hack Day — Yahoo! Internal Hack Day Event at Yahoo HQ (Sunnyvale, CA USA), June 6, 2006 Organi …   Wikipedia

  • hack — {{11}}hack (n.1) tool for chopping, early 14c., from HACK (Cf. hack) (v.1); Cf. Dan. hakke mattock, Ger. Hacke pickax, hatchet, hoe. Meaning an act of cutting is from 1836; figurative sense of a try, an attempt is first attested 1898. {{12}}hack… …   Etymology dictionary

  • hack — I [[t]hæk[/t]] v. t. 1) to cut, notch, slice, chop, or sever with irregular, often heavy blows (often fol. by up or down): to hack down trees[/ex] 2) to clear (a road, path, etc.) by cutting away vines, trees, or other growth 3) to damage or… …   From formal English to slang

  • hack — I. verb Etymology: Middle English hakken, from Old English haccian; akin to Old High German hacchōn to hack, Old English hōc hook Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. a. to cut or sever with repeated irregular or unskillful blows b. to cut or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • hack — I. /hæk / (say hak) verb (t) 1. to cut, notch, or chop irregularly, as with heavy blows. 2. to break up the surface of (the ground). 3. to clear (a path, etc.) by cutting down brush, etc. 4. to damage by cutting harshly or ruthlessly: the… …   Australian English dictionary

  • hack — 01. We [hacked] a few dead branches off the tree to burn as firewood. 02. A number of villagers were [hacked] to death with axes and machetes by the guerrillas. 03. It took us hours to [hack] through the dense undergrowth of the forest to the… …   Grammatical examples in English

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